Sexual Harassment Litigation

Sexual harassment suits are emotionally devastating and difficult for both the plaintiff and the attorney. If you are an attorney or plaintiff with expenses piling up while a sexual harassment settlement remains to be paid out, RD Legal Funding may be able to help you with your cash flow issues. Our proprietary Fee Acceleration program can provide immediate lawsuit financing. Fill out the brief application to the right to become eligible for a free consultation with a legal funding specialist — or call 1-800-565-5177 to speak with a Fee Acceleration expert.

About Sexual Harassment

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 carries broad prohibitions against sexual discrimination, specifically against sexual harassment. According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), sexual harassment can include unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature. Harassment can be perpetrated by a man or a woman, does not have to be of a sexual nature, and can include offensive remarks about a person’s sex. Harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment or when it results in an adverse employment decision.

To qualify as harassment, the offending behavior must be severe or pervasive and satisfy two tests:

  • Objective test – would the conduct offend any reasonable person in that same position; and
  • Subjective test – was the employee actually offended?

Title VII covers all private employers, federal, state and local governments, education institutions that employ 15 or more individuals, private and public employment agencies, labor organizations, and joint labor management committees controlling apprenticeship and training.  Some states carry additional laws prohibiting sexual harassment in companies that employ less than 15 employees.
In 2011, the EEOC received 99,947 charges of sexual harassment and 11,364 charges were lodged.

Major sexual harassment lawsuits include:

  • The Tailhook Convention shone a spotlight on sexual harassment of women in the armed forces. The Navy failed to investigate whistle blower Paula Coughlin’s allegations but she was awarded $1.7 million in compensatory and $5 million in punitive damages when she sued the hotel for failing to provide adequate security.
  • Mitsubishi Motors Manufacturing paid $34 million to female workers at the Normal, Illinois plant where they were routinely fondled, verbally abused, subjected to obscene jokes, behavior and graffiti. Women were denied promotions when they refused to grant sexual favors.
  • In 2011 the U.S. Supreme Court blocked sex discrimination suit against Wal-Mart, the largest class action suit in U.S. history. More than one million women alleged that they faced systemic sexism, were paid less than men in comparable positions, received fewer promotions, and waited longer for promotions.
  • Best Buy settled a lawsuit in 2011 asserting that the company discriminated against women as well as African American and Latino employees by denying them promotions and more lucrative sales positions. As part of the settlement, Best Buy agreed to change its personnel policies and procedures. The settlement amount was $200,000, however Best Buy paid its attorneys $10 million.

Post-Settlement Funding for Attorneys and Plaintiffs with Sexual Harassment Settlements

Sexual harassment legal proceedings are stressful and expensive. Settlement financing may be a solution for cash-flow problems, both for the plaintiffs and their attorneys. Call 1-800-565-5177 to speak with a Fee Acceleration expert or fill out the brief application to the right to become eligible for a free consultation with a legal funding specialist.


Apply Now for your free legal funding consultation
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